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Camping the Copyright Way

Back in September my best friend Beca and I took our first camping trip together. Anyone who has spoken to us since can verify this because it’s all we talked about for weeks. It was our first adventure together and we needed to do a lot of research before we headed out to get lost in the woods (or, more accurately, headed to a well-established campground in the Chicago suburbs). Resources were easily available for us to find the information we needed to prepare. We looked at Pinterest camping lists, watched REI videos, and talked to our outdoorsy friends. The trip was a success.

photo of Beca Putnam and Abby Eastvold
Beca and I on our camping trip (Photo by me)

Navigating the copyright rules associated with sharing works such as photos online can feel like trying to prepare for a camping trip without the same resources we had to guide us. It’s easy to save and share other people’s work and for other people to do the same with your work. This does not necessarily mean that it is ethical, though. Copyrights give original creators the rights to their works online, whether they are professional or not.

Not only is Beca my best friend and adventure buddy, she is also a professional photographer. I decided to sit down with her and ask her about her experiences with copyright and sharing work online. The conversation helped to make the best practices a little clearer. Beca helped to explain best practices for ethically sharing others’ work online. We mainly discussed Instagram, as that is where she shares a lot of her work. Each platform has its own Terms of Service and sharing and tagging functions. Best practices may vary from platform to platform. With that in mind, many of the same principles apply across platforms. Her experiences provided further insight for me. Beca and I had a great time recording this interview. I hope you all find the conversation equally informative and entertaining.

Conversation with Beca Putnam

To view more of Beca Putnam’s work follow her on Instagram.

2 replies on “Camping the Copyright Way”

Really good insight! I love the chemistry between the two of you, and the relatability you made with myself as a listener! I hate the most on instagram when someone screenshots a story and reposts it, the tags are still there but no longer useful links because it’s a screenshot….

I agree. I wish Instagram would make the sharing of stories more seamless. Unless if you’re tagged in a story you can’t share a story to your story. The links are an important way people navigate Instagram.

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